Friday, July 6, 2018

I Wish I'd Written This


More treats from tinywords 
(one of the poetry sites which I subscribe to by email, also featured previously)


paperback romance
 a bend in the spine
 at the sultry part

-Alexander B. Joy


another funeral
for a childhood friend
flickering campfire

-Joan Prefontaine


lingering jet lag –
the clunk of a foreign coin
in the clothes dryer

-Julie Bloss Kelsey


glassy lake
flocks of snow geese
pull up the moon

(haiga)

-Debbie Strange


summer breeze
the scent of juniper
in my tumbler

-Jeff Hoagland


morning light
painting over
my painting

-Debbi Antebi


tinywords publishes 'haiku and other small poems'.

I love all kinds of micropoetry, and hope you enjoy them too!

I think it is very, very hard to write a really good haiku. I keep trying. Meanwhile I like to read other people's attempts.

Opinions still differ as to the rules for haiku. In line with current thinking about English-language haiku, I like short/long/short lines of fewer than 5/7/5 syllables, which I am assured is more approximate to Japanese units of sound. And I think they must be more than merely descriptive verses; they need to have some kind of 'aha!' moment.

Traditionally they must be about nature, with the season indicated, and they must contain a pause between juxtaposed images. In Japanese haiku the pause happens via a 'kireji' word which has that function. In English-language haiku it can be indicated by punctuation, such as a dash, or the haiku can be written in such a way that it's obvious.


Of course some of these above are senryu, which deal with human behaviour, often with a touch of humour.

For those who may not know, a haiga is a combination of haiku and picture. Do click on the haiga link above; the image is spectacular.



Material shared in 'I Wish I'd Written This' is presented for study and review. Poems, photos and other writings remain the property of the copyright owners, usually their authors.

22 comments:

  1. This post IS a treat, Rosemary. Such lovely images, and moments, to contemplate. Hmmmmmm, maybe I will give haiku a try. Since words are sparse these days, my flagging muse might find it easier. Thanks for the inspiration.

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    1. I find Satya Robyn's 'small stones' idea helpful when blocked. Small stones are not unlike haiku, in that the focus is outside the self, they are brief, and they most often describe the natural world. But they don't have the strict rules of haiku. (They don't even have to be in verse, though mine usually are.)
      https://selfpublishingadvice.org/how-writing-small-stones-hones-the-writers-craft/

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  2. Thank you so much for introducing me to tinywords, Rosemary, a poetry site I will be sure to follow!

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    1. It's so nice to receive one of these gems in the inbox every morning!

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  3. Love them, each so unique and true with a little grin attached. I agree, this is the hardest kind of writing.

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  4. Fabulous haikus....will check out more about the haiga. Thanks for sharing these!

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  5. I really like all of these, Rosemary. I should try to write some micro poetry again. Thanks for the inspiration.

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  6. I subscribe to this also. They are amazing!

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    1. Oh yes, aren't they! I keep thinking, one day I'll submit....

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  7. I subscribe to my email too. And following. Such gems! Thank you, thank you Rosemary.

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    1. Ah, I'm glad you too are enjoying the tinywords.

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  8. i loved short verses.
    i subscribed to tinywords too, and the little poems come to me in the middle of the night on my handphone. most of the poems are absolute gems. i am thinking of submitting some haiku to them, let's see when. :)

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    1. I love your short verses! You should definitely submit.

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  9. I enjoyed the poems, printed them, and shared them. Thank you RoseMary.

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  10. One and three are my favourites. I'm pro brevity in poetry. Less is more.

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    1. I bet number 1 is everybody's favourite! Certainly mine. My second favourite is the last one.

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  11. Beautiful haiku from Tinywords. I remember in the early days Tinywords used to have a feature where one could subscribe to receive a haiku of the day on your mobile phone every day. That was fabulous.
    Thanks for your selection this week Rosemary

    much love...

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  12. Thank you for this wonderful selection of Tinywords Rosemary - I love them!
    Anna :o]

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